Andy Frankenberger scored a perfect 800 on his math SAT while a day student at the elite Phillips Academy. He passed up Harvard for Duke, graduating with dual degrees in Russian—he’s been fluent since high school after a two-month semester in Siberia—and Economics. He was part of the founding team for the currency trading desk at JP Morgan in Moscow. Continued success on Wall Street earned him friends in high places, including the hedge fund billionaire David Einhorn. When he left Wall Street in 2009, his goal wasn’t to become a professional poker player. But he played well in his underground games and with Wall Street buddies to give poker a try. Enough wins brought him to his first big tournaments, and eventually his first professional title, at a 2010 Venetian tourney, besting 350 people for the six-figure prize.

Frankenberger is handsome, tall, with rust-colored hair and warm brown eyes. Fair skin that burns or freckles, but probably never tans. He purposely left his razor at home, Frankenberger tells me, because when he comes to Vegas he likes to get a straight shave once a week. It’s been a week already, and no shave, so his facial hair growth pattern is fully visible: scattered swirls of russet stubble.

Outside the Mandarin Oriental, where we have just finished looking at luxury residences, the valet pulls up with Frankenberger’s car, a silver Mercedes sedan he’s rented for the duration of the World Series of Poker. It’s not nearly as cool as the silver Mercedes he has back in the city, a tiny coupe with massage seats, but a luxury vehicle nonetheless. We get in, crank the air conditioning up to full blast, and let the car idle in the valet section. We are waiting to hear back from Phil Hellmuth, to see if he can join us for dinner, Thai food at Lotus of Siam. Hellmuth texts back that he can be there in an hour and a half, about six o’clock. Frankenberger puts the car into gear and like five seconds later his phone rings. It’s Hellmuth. He wants to know whether we’d be interested in joining him for nine holes at Shadow Creek, and have we heard of it? “We’ll eat plates of lobsters,” he says. “They’ll pour us $400 shots.”

We meet Hellmuth, who is dressed all in black, his “thing” Frankenberger tells me, in the VIP lot in the back of the Rio. There are double-wide trailers set up nearest the staircase, a luxury certain pros allow themselves. Not Frankenberger, and not Hellmuth either. His BMW is all black, too, cream inside. We cruise in air-conditioned, leather-upholstered comfort through the parched desert—me, Frankenberger, Hellmuth, and Hellmuth’s friend Chris Connor—past the strip, to North Las Vegas where the ultra exclusive Shadow Creek Golf Course is an irrigated and verdant mirage. “I’m dreading the day when a best friend of mine has a wedding during the Main Event [a guaranteed prize of $10mm, and the title of No-limit Texas Hold’em World Champion],” Frankenberger says. “A cousin did that to me once,” says Hellmuth. “I didn’t show up.”

Jonathan, our caddy for the evening, is waiting for us in a golf cart by the parking lot. God forbid we actually set foot on the maybe 10 yards of asphalt between our vehicle and the doors to the Shadow Creek men’s locker room. There is a short discussion at the threshold, what we’d like to eat after the game: lobster tails, chilled, and jumbo prawns and chicken salad sandwiches. “You know what I like,” Hellmuth says to the woman in charge of feeding us. We are the only ones there. The club is otherwise closed. Just us. And Jonathan. Inside the men’s locker room are walls of blond wood lockers, each with a brass (or could it be gold?!) plaque engraved with the name of its owner: Michael Jordan, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Tiger Woods, Phil Hellmuth. There is green-and-red plaid pile carpeting, a chilled silver bucket with individually wrapped moist hand toilettes resting on a bed of ice, and assorted citrus wedge garnish.

Hellmuth changes into his golf clothes, Connor is already wearing his, and this is the lucky one day that Frankenberger happens to be wearing shorts. His Lanvin patent leather-tipped sneakers will be just fine on the course; they keep it pristine. I slather on sunscreen dispensed from a giant pump in the corner. We all do. Hellmuth: “Let’s hit it boys. And girl.” They play the nine holes as a scramble, Hellmuth and Frankenberger against Connor. I help putt, when they ask, and I talk to Jonathan, who eats shrimp gumbo out of a Styrofoam cup. Hellmuth tells us he once played here with Tiger Woods for an ESPN special. “One million dollars a hole,” he says. “It made great TV.” There are giant electric fans like steel drums that blow a gentle breeze against certain of the some 21,000 trees—“so they don’t develop a fungus,” Jonathan explains. There is a flowing stream. There are ducks sitting on the lawn, and other game birds. There is a “very mean” swan. There is a waterfall. Shadow Creek should not exist.

Golfing With Two of Poker’s Biggest Names at the WSOP2

Waiting for us in the dining room are chilled plates of crustless finger sandwiches, plates of sliced lobster tail with glass dishes of cocktail sauce, and lemon wedges. Hellmuth drinks Blue Moon from a frosty glass and samples from a plate of orange wedges. We order glasses of the house white, a Far Niente chardonnay from Napa that happens to be one of Frankenberger’s most favorite, and is not inexpensive. The conversation pivots to a good night’s rest; Hellmuth can sleep 12 hours a night, easy.

“You’re talking to someone who has sleep apnea—I know the value of sleep,” Frankenberger says.

“Wait, you have sleep apnea, too?” Hellmuth says. “So do I.”

They debate the merit of wearing a CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) mask to bed.

At first, Frankenberger was reluctant. “I didn’t want to get the machine because it’s not very sexy, and a girl is going to be over and she’s going to see a machine—I’m like, anything but that. But now, I’m like, fuck it. This is my thing, I have a fucking old man machine, whatever.”

“Sleep apnea is no joke,” says Hellmuth.

Out come a wicker basket of crinkle-cut potato chips and a bottle of Johnnie Walker Platinum, a label none of us knew existed. And the conversation inevitably returns to poker. “The way I describe it,” Frankenberger says, “is you have to be good enough to put yourself in a position to get lucky.”

“Well I have a different definition than everybody else of this stuff,” says Hellmuth. “Everybody else thinks one way, and I think a different way. The kids can’t imagine, because there’s no breakdown for it mathematically—all these genius kids that have grown up playing online, they’re math geniuses. And I’m like, okay, are you guys fucking dumb? You think that math is going to trump reading ability? So I had to coin a term: white magic. It’s 30% play it perfect and put yourself in a position to get lucky. There’s lot of truth in that.”

Frankenberger has been pointing out the Kid Geniuses to me all week: gangly, nerdy-looking young boys, college-age, with backpacks and usually glasses.

“For some reason, Andy doesn’t get credit,” says Hellmuth. “I don’t exactly understand why not. He thinks so far outside the box, and he’s a little bit…goofy. And so, because of that, they don’t give him much credit? They don’t give me credit, I think, because sometimes I’m a brat on T.V.”

It’s late now. Their CPAPs beckon. Everyone drains their glass and pulls out variations on the same fat wallet. The whole evening hasn’t cost Hellmuth or anyone else a dime: Luxury is free when you have enough money. A bouquet of $100 bills is assembled and pressed into the palm of our humbled waiter.

“Plates of lobsters,” Frankenberger mouths to me, grinning, thumbs up.

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Late one night at his kitchen table, J. Kevin White visualized a solution to a problem he had grappled with for years. He needed a device that would let people diagnose their own vision problems, without an optometrist. Fiddling with a pair of bifocals, he imagined stretching out the the full spectrum of vision adjustments across a single lens, each prescription a different curvature. He grabbed a yellow legal pad and started sketching.

“I designed it in total from that epiphany moment,” says White, 50, who leads the nonprofit Global Vision 2020. Five years later, he can hold the finished product in his hand: USee, a low-tech, low-cost tool for diagnosing vision problems and prescribing glasses without an eye doctor.

The USee reduces the educational and technological barriers keeping an estimated 2.5 billion people around the world from getting the glasses they need.

J. Kevin Smith of Global Vision 2020 demonstrates the USee at the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals Zone on Jan. 31, 2018.

In areas of the developing world, eye doctors can be as rare as one in 1 million. The USee reduces the educational and technological barriers keeping an estimated 2.5 billion people around the world from getting the glasses they need to learn, work, and more.

A $72,000 prize from the DC Creator Awards, a WeWork-sponsored competition for innovators, brought White closer to that target by allowing him to produce the USee for the first time, using 3D printed frames and computer-cut lenses. So far, Global Vision 2020 has distributed 6,000 pairs of eyeglasses using their kits, which include the USee diagnostic tool, snap-in lenses, and frames.

In the last year, Global Vision 2020’s efforts have been concentrated in Mozambique, where White estimates 5.6 million people have no or limited access to eyeglasses. In 2016 and 2017, the organization conducted field trials at four of the country’s high schools, using teachers as the screeners and getting glasses to all students who needed them.

Global Vision 2020 Completed Filed Trials in Mozambique in 2017
A student in Mozambique finds his prescription using the USee.

The USee system helps lower the cost per pair of glasses to $4. But White’s goal is to cut that figure in half, a target he may reach this year thanks to his most recent funding boost. In January, Global Vision 2020 made it to the Creator Awards Global Finals in New York City, and White wound up a $1 million winner, standing stunned on stage alongside his two sons, Oliver and Owen.

This will allow us to produce thousands of the device, instead of tens and twenties,” he says. “This is a large capital investment that the $1 million more than covers.”

Eye-opening realization

White first noticed the challenge of delivering inexpensive eyeglasses to developing nations during his 20-year career in the US Marine Corps. As the director of humanitarian civic assistance—which he calls the “coolest job I ever had”—he allocated part of his $16 million budget to giving away eyeglasses in parts of Africa and Eastern Europe. “That opened my eyes to the fact that lots of people can’t get the glasses they need,” he says.

When White was jotting down ideas in his kitchen in 2014, he had been dwelling on two major issues: cost and coolness. Before the USee, the nonprofit, founded in 2009, gave out bulky, adjustable eyeglasses that were $22 a pop. While innovative at the time, young people didn’t want to wear the odd-looking specs. Now Global Vision 2020 sends out the USee device with each kit, along with a stockpile of standard frames and snap-in lenses.

First tested on White’s youngest son Oliver, who’s now 13, the USee uses a lens bar ranging from negative six to positive six, the standard range for vision checks. Each prescription is stated in easy-to-understand color and number combinations. If a user sees most clearly at Red 2, they can then snap corresponding lenses into a new set of frames and walk out the door with new glasses in 10 minutes.

Looking for partners

The first prototype of the USee lens was developed in 2014 with the help of Oxford University researcher Dr. David Crosby, one of White’s connections from his military career. White says few others in the world could have brought his sketch to life. This happens many times over in White’s quest to bring eyesight to the masses: experts in their fields willing to lend a hand for a worthy cause.

The most recent instance came in 2016 at Johns Hopkins University, where White is currently pursuing an MBA. Finding himself at the doorstep of world-class medical research facilities, White connected with the Wilmer Eye Institute’s Dr. David Friedman, who was willing to conduct trials using the prototype developed by Crosby. The trials were completed in 2017, and just this month, peer-reviewed journal Plos published the results.

“I look back on my life and it’s just coincidence after coincidence,” White says.

Photo by Emanuel HahnReflecting on his lucky breaks, White thinks back to his days at the Naval Academy, when a family who hosted him on weekends told him, “Coincidences are the Lord’s way of remaining anonymous.”

“I look back on my life and it’s just coincidence after coincidence,” White says.

Looking to the future, White wants to create more government-level partnerships in countries like Mozambique, where he continues to build relationships with education officials.

“Our goal,” he says, “is for someone to say, ‘Hey, we want 2,000 kits,’ and we say, ‘Great, give us three weeks.’”

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Bitcoin is the inescapable “next big thing” that will reportedly replace the banks and disrupt our entire financial system. While Bitcoin and the technology it’s built on are still in their infancy, entrepreneurs can benefit from being early adopters. (Please note: The following should not be considered financial advice.)

Five essential takeaways for Bitcoin

Bitcoin is a currency built on top of a technology called the blockchain, which I’ll explore in more detail later. Here’s the main gist of Bitcoin:

  1. It allows for a culture of full transparency where all transactions can be viewed by anyone on a “distributed ledger,” a table that lists all transactions occurring on the blockchain. You can see these transactions in real time with a blockchain explorer like Blockchain.info or Blockcypher.
  2. Transactions are irreversible. Once you send Bitcoin, you can’t cancel the transaction.
  3. Transactions are anonymous. To send or receive bitcoin, you need to set up a virtual wallet. Each wallet has a unique ID composed of random numbers and letters like 1NRedxSzhx7r. This is used in lieu of a real-name identity.
  4. There are only 21 million Bitcoins that will ever be in existence, a rule hard-coded into Bitcoin’s software. These coins are generated through a process called mining, which is very similar to mining for gold or diamonds but instead uses computing power to solve a mathematical puzzle. In addition to mining Bitcoin, miners also profit off the transaction fees since their computing hardware powers and connects the blockchain.
  5. It’s both a very volatile, decentralized currency and a storage of value with no central authority calling the shots.

How to purchase Bitcoin

  1. Sign up for Coinbase, which is by far one of the most trusted and reputable exchanges.
  2. In the US, you will need to verify your identity to be accepted to most legitimate exchanges. Once your ID is approved, you can then purchase Bitcoin or a small fraction of a Bitcoin. You can spend as little as $10. With such a volatile new currency, it’s important to only spend as much as you’re comfortable with losing.

What is the blockchain?

CryptoKitties illustrates key points about the blockchain
CryptoKitties is one of the first games built on the blockchain.

The blockchain is the underlying technology that makes Bitcoin work. Think of it as the App Store, with Bitcoin an app built on top of the blockchain. There are many other blockchains and cryptocurrencies. Ethereum, co-created by Vitalik Buterin, is one of the major competitors in the space and uses its own currency, called Ether.

Just like you can build any app and launch it in the App Store, you can build apps, commonly referred to as Dapps (decentralized apps), on the blockchain. Companies choose to build on the blockchain because it allows for full transparency—anyone can view each block on the chain—and accountability, meaning there can’t be any gaps in the chain, as each chain builds off of the next.

One silly but salient Dapp is CryptoKitties, a game where you can spend Ether to raise your own kittens. Companies like Maersk and IBM are working together to use the blockchain for other uses cases, like making global shipping industry more efficient.

Three opportunities for entrepreneurs

  1. Be active, any time. Now that you have your Bitcoin, you’re now a part of a global economy that is active 24/7, not bankers’ hours. You can participate in ICOs (Initial Coin Offerings, explained below), join other exchanges, and trade with other alt-coins. You can even make real-world purchases, like buy furniture from overstock.com. This is where you begin to see the true utility and revolution of cryptocurrencies.
  2. Raise capital. As an entrepreneur, you can launch your own coin and raise money from the public via an ICO instead of the typical seed or angel round. Keep in mind there will be heavy regulations around ICOs. Companies like the messaging app Telegram are raising well over $1 billion in their ICO.
  3. Help bring others on to the blockchain. You can also engage with the blockchain as an entrepreneur by consulting or development services to bring companies, cities, and even your own company on to the blockchain, like ConsenSys did. ConsenSys and IBM are working together to bring the city of Dubai on to the blockchain. Other companies, like Digital Asset Holdings, led by the extraordinary Blythe Masters, are working to bring institutions and exchanges on to their blockchain technology.

Three dangers of the blockchain

Almost anything could be built on top of or migrated to the blockchain—but that doesn’t mean it should. With Bitcoin and blockchain come tremendous upside and risks. Here are a few:

  1. Regulation. Governments around the world are cracking down on cryptocurrencies and ICOs, so be sure to read up on your local laws.
  2. Vaporware and Ponzi schemes. The majority of ICOs are companies that have no real technology, team, or product. Facebook recently banned ads for cryptocurrency and ICOs out of concern for “deceptive promotional practices.” They are designed to take your money if you don’t do your research.
  3. Scale. Dapps are still struggling with scale as small but popular ones like CryptoKitties are slowing down transaction times on the Ethereum blockchain. Imagine what would happen if purchasing came to a standstill because one app slowed everything down.

All hype aside, Bitcoin and the blockchain do have opportunities for entrepreneurs savvy enough to seize them. See where it might take you and your business.

 

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From Shanghai to Nashville, the Year of the Dog is already in full effect at the pup-ready workspaces of WeWork. On Instagram, #dogsofwework has nearly 5,000 posts, and when WeWork brought its dog-friendly workspaces to Japan—a market with more pets than children—it made headline news in Bloomberg. (Thinking about starting dog-friendly policies in your spot? Here’s a ruff guide for that.)

Life’s a gas

Max is a dog of many talents
Katy Conrad and Max in New York City

Katy Conrad + Max

Location: WeWork HQ, New York City

Company: WeWork

What’s the best tip for bringing your dog to work? The best way to make sure your dog is comfortable at the office is to bring lots of treats, including treats to share. Just like us humans need a snack after a long day at the office, having a bag of treats helps make sure Max and his office puppy pals are all enjoying themselves, and able to get through the workday, too. A bunch of snuggles doesn’t hurt, either.

What’s your dog’s superpower? Besides being cute, his ability to end any meeting with his gas.

The office flirt

Fiona Webborn's pug, Nugget
Fiona Webborn’s dog Nugget in London

Fiona Webborn + Nug the Pug

Location: WeWork Spitalfields, London

Company: The Cotton Story

Why do you bring your canine friend to work?

He’s so cute, why wouldn’t I want to spend all day with him? He’s been coming in since he was 10 weeks old and is now really confident and friendly around all sort of people and dogs of all sizes.

What’s important to know before bringing a dog to work?

That everyone will forget you exist and forget your name because they now see you as “Nugget’s mum” or “the girl with the tiny pug.”

“Everyone will forget you exist and forget your name because they now see you as ‘Nugget’s mum.’”

Your dog as an emoji: 😘 Because he’s such a flirt with all the other dogs and members!

What’s your dog’s superpower?

Being able to finish his lunch in under 10 seconds flat.

 

Will sprint for belly rubs

Teddy uses constant reinforcement with his dog Scout
Teddy Connell and Scout in Atlanta

Teddy Connell + Scout

Location: WeWork Tower Place, Atlanta

Company: WeWork

What’s behind her name? Scout is a 6-year-old Blue-Heeler mix from Aberdeen, Mississippi. She’s named after Scout Finch [from To Kill A Mockingbird] and has become a part of the WeWork Tower Place community team.

What’s the best tip for bringing your dog to work? Pleasant interpersonal relationships seem to be the most reinforcing stimulus for a dog. After all, they are pack animals with complex social structures that eventually led to them synchronizing with human society. Always be watching for desirable behavior to positively reinforce your pup with, because they’ll always be watching you.

What’s your dog’s superpower? Asking for what she wants. She has been known to sprint towards members only to then slide on her side to stop perfectly in position for a belly rub.

 

Grumpy but loveable

Herby came from a shelter and is sometimes grumpy, but still loveable
Isabel Borst and Herby in Berlin (Photo by Milon Quayim)

Isabel Borst + Herby

Location: WeWork Hackescher Markt, Berlin

Company: WeWork

What’s the best tip for bringing your dog to work? Willingness to adapt is very important. The members love him, and he loves the attention he gets from them. There were moments, though, that I noticed he was getting quite stressed. I bring him to the office between two or three times per week, and I avoid bringing him if I know it will be a very busy day.

The fun part is that the members have also adapted to him. They know Herby doesn’t like hugs and clapping and that they shouldn’t feed him because he’s trying to lose some weight. At the end, the most important part is to respect his limits and make sure he is not disturbing anyone.

Your dog as an emoji: 😒 He’s both a grumpy man and a good pal.

What’s your dog’s superpower? Herby has the power of finding food in every bush. Normally he finds sandwiches, but last weekend he found a whole pizza.

 

Pastry bandit

Leah Gwin, a member from Inflammo, and her dog Harper
Leah Gwin and Harper in Nashville

Leah Gwin + Harper

Location: WeWork 901 Woodland, Nashville, Tennessee

Company: Inflammo

Why do you bring your dog to work? Instead of sitting at home bored all day, she’s able to come hang out with me, meet other dogs, and get loved on by WeWork members. I also—selfishly—love having her around because her bright, spunky spirit keeps me feeling positive, and she always finds things to do that make me laugh throughout the day.

What’s the best tip for adjusting to the office environment? Exercise. Exercise. Exercise. I have found this is the key to a well-behaved dog at work. Harper is a 1-year-old puppy, so she has a lot of fun energy. When I take her on runs or to the dog park before work, she cooperates way better. We also love taking walks during lunchtime or throwing the ball at the park nearby.

If your dog were an emoji, which would he/she be? 💃  Harper is always the life of the party.

What’s your dog’s superpower? Invisibility. She snuck upstairs at a friend’s house a few weeks ago without us seeing and ate 27 pastries.

 

Quiet cuddler

WeWork Weihai Lu is dog friendly
Bonnie Li’s dog Captain in Shanghai

Bonnie Li + Captain

Location: WeWork Weihai Lu, Shanghai

Company: WeWork

Why do you bring your canine friend to work? We have a lot of dogs in our community, so Captain can make friends here. If one day I don’t bring him to work, lots of members ask me, “Where is Captain?”

How do you know if your dog is ready to be a WeWork dog? The dog should be quiet and under your control, and also less than 14 kilograms or 30 pounds.

Your dog as an emoji: 😳

What’s your dog’s superpower? Being friendly and not barking.

 

Vibe manager

Rufino's Monica Limanto brings her dog Yoji Yoshimoto to work with her
Monica Limanto’s dog Yoji Yoshimoto in Sydney

Monica Limanto + Yoji Yoshimoto

Location: WeWork Pyrmont, Sydney

Company: Rufino

Why do you bring your canine friend to work? It makes the office a happier place. Dogs create instant good vibes.

What’s important to know before bringing a dog to work? Be respectful of the workplace and practice good manners by ensuring your dog is toilet trained, the office door is kept closed, and there is a dog bed, water, snacks, and toys for your pup to keep them occupied and comfortable during the day.

Your dog as an emoji: 💩

What’s your dog’s superpower? Making food disappear

 

 

Dog walker app trainer

WeWork Ipanema member GoDog uses Lexa to train walkers
Julia Aranha’s dog Lexa in Rio de Janeiro

Julia Graça Aranha + Lexa

Location: WeWork Ipanema, Rio de Janeiro

Company: WeWork

Why do you bring your canine friend to work? She makes everyone’s day better. Even though the Ipanema building has only been open for 10 days, Lexa has already become the mascot. We have a dog walking app in our building, GoDog, that uses her every day to train new dog walkers.

What’s important to know before bringing a dog to work? People will “borrow” your dog, so if yours goes missing, it’s probably in someone else’s office.

Must-have toy to keep your dog happy: Toy to chew on.

What’s your dog’s superpower? Help people lose their fear of dogs.

 

WeWork's dog friendly policies have a lot of fans
Nugget and a friend in London

 

 

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How do you set the mood for love? For one Detroit couple, it’s all about ideas, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Fance Logan and Keith Shadwick met last year at the Creator Awards, WeWork’s global competition for innovators. They connected over a love for sharing ideas and starting up new collaborations.

Usually, the Creator Awards’s impact is measured in the $15 million awarded, the 167 winners, or the 170 jobs created. But now they can count one relationship—and one baby on the way.

As Logan, 32, and Shadwick, 27, get ready to welcome a baby boy in March, they continue to follow their passions. For Logan, that’s real estate and fashion events, including the annual runway show, Fashion Massacre, now in its ninth year. Shadwick is developing a new fashion line, Prewave and Co. We caught up with the couple between their startups and side hustles to learn more about how they met and what baby names they’re considering.

Congratulations on the baby! How exactly did you meet at the Detroit Creator Awards?

Logan: At the time, I was just laid off from one of my jobs doing property management. I was downtown, it was a rainy day, and you guys had this glass pitch booth thing [where anyone could come up and pitch an idea for a chance to win money], which was so fascinating to me. The whole setup was something unique. I went in out of curiosity.

The Detroit Creator Awards sets up a pitch booth downtown.

Shadwick: We met at the pitch booth. I saw her walking around while I was pitching my idea. We started asking each other about business and entrepreneurship.

Logan: That’s how me and him started talking to each other, off our ideas. Some of the ideas he had were so amazing. Then we said, “OK, maybe I’ll see you later.” I saw him later that night at the awards ceremony, and we just hit it off. You don’t usually meet people talking about the entrepreneurial spirit. We both had that in common. He was just open forideas and open for creativity.

Shadwick: We ended up hanging out until Wyclef Jean performed, and that sparked something.

Were you hoping to meet anyone?

Logan: It was fascinating how I met Keith. I wasn’t expecting to meet anyone. Keith wasn’t planning to meet anyone, either. He just had a natural curiosity to be part of something. To meet in that element is amazing. It’s out of curiosity, and here I am, eight months pregnant, and we’re soon to be married. It’s a beautiful story.

How did you connect about entrepreneurship?

Shadwick: We started talking about fashion and different things. I was starting my brand, Prewave and Co. I have no design school background. It’s just in my spirit. Fance started talking to me about how to go about branding. She was telling me a certain way to go about it, being really professional about every aspect like consistent artwork, content, and stories behind the fashion.

Logan: We are [also] working on a real estate company focused on promoting homeownership, called Optimistic Realities. Homeownership sometimes seems intimidating to people. We’ve been leasing and are in the process of purchasing a home soon. We’ll buy homes and fix them up and offer programs for people so they could purchase their own home.

How does Detroit influence what you’re doing?

Shadwick: I’m from the westside in Detroit, where there’s violence, but it’s been reported that violence has gone down. This is the time to start doing things. It was a dark time in Detroit, but now there are lots of entrepreneurs, and networking is golden right now. My next collection is called Flourish Detroit.

Do you know what you’ll name the baby?

Logan: Sensei, which means master teacher. We’re putting that into the atmosphere.

How will you teach the entrepreneurial spirit to the next generation?

Logan: Lead by example. That’s the only way to teach someone. When I said me and Keith are going to buy a home soon, we’re doing it to lead by example.

So… would you recommend the Creator Awards as a place to find love?

Shadwick: For sure. It attracts people with a positive light and a mind to create. We all are creators, no matter what we do. Our words create our destiny. To actually create a human from that event is amazing in itself. It’s meant to be.

Photo by Craig Lewis II

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