In this series, WeWork’s director of digital community selects a WeWork member to get to know better, sharing her fun findings with the rest of the community.

When I met Kevin Carlson, the founder of Dawgtown, I loved the premise of his app: helping connect dog owners and their pets with awesome places to visit and things to do. (Turns out the WeWork Congress member started Dawgtown after his memorable time working on the TV series South Park.) Read on to learn about Carlson’s experiences working in comedy, making new friends through dog ownership, and more.

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Well, I was born and raised in Houston, Texas, so I grew up loving Tex-Mex, loathing Mattress Mack commercials, and hating mosquitoes with all my heart. My life changed drastically when I moved to Austin in 2010 to attend the University of Texas. I majored in film and TV production and happened into a job at Tugg, Inc., a young, promising film distribution startup that sparked my interest in entrepreneurship. After two great years at Tugg, graduation was on the horizon and I had to figure out where my life was headed.

UT has a great program called UTLA—University of Texas Los Angeles—allowing seniors to spend a semester finishing their coursework while interning in the entertainment industry to see if it’s a good fit. So I moved out to Los Angeles in the summer of 2013 and was offered an internship at Comedy Central in their development department, where I provided notes on incoming scripts and attended pitch meetings from some amazingly talented writers and producers.

Starting in South Park, Kevin Carlson Heads Straight to Dawgtown2

When it was all said and done, I’d received an invaluable education on the art of the pitch. My internship came to an end, and I had already booked a flight back to Texas for my graduation ceremony when I was offered a position at South Park—to start the following Monday. I knew I’d forfeit the opportunity if I left, so I missed my flight and jumped right into the real world at South Park. Over the course of 2014, I worked in production on Season 18 of the show and helped out with South Park’s video game, The Stick of Truth, which culminated in the most exciting, stressful, and animated year of my life.

After the season wrapped, I had a bit of time off for the holidays, and I unexpectedly found myself questioning whether this was the career ladder I wanted to climb. I had been getting more serious about pursuing a business idea that had garnered positive feedback from trusted friends and colleagues, and it became surprisingly clear to me that I would never be in a better position to take a leap. When one of South Park’s technical directors expressed interest in heading up development on Dawgtown, I packed up and made the drive back to Austin to break ground on a mobile software company that aims to place a dog owner’s local community of dog-friendly people, places, and products in the palm of their hand.

A year later, I’m so proud of what we’ve done with Dawgtown and excited for the road ahead. And though I no longer feel a need to justify the decisions that got me here, I do still enjoy reminiscing on how much of that 22-hour drive back from Los Angeles was spent fearing that I’d just made the biggest mistake of my life.

Starting in South Park, Kevin Carlson Heads Straight to Dawgtown3

What was that experience like? Do you still keep in touch with the team there?

For me, the most incredible thing about it all was seeing how a company that successful can maintain such creative control over their brand and leverage that as a source of creative inspiration to keep going at such an intense pace. And if you’ve seen the documentary 6 Days to Air, you know that intense is an understatement. To ensure that Comedy Central will be able to air a new episode during its scheduled time slot on Wednesday nights, the South Park crew works a 24-hour sprint each Tuesday to polish and ship the final cut by Wednesday morning. Experiencing that shift for the first time felt a lot like trying to sprint a mile when you haven’t jogged in six months.

Working from one sunrise to the next took some getting used to, but one of the highlights of my time on the show also happened somewhere between 3:00 to 6:00 AM on Tuesdays. Matt Stone would weave through the office, rallying any zombies he could find to come to the sound booth where we would record audio for the crowds, mobs, and any other group scenes an episode necessitated. We’d run through a scene one time while Matt explained the context, and moments later, we were yelling, jeering, and laughing at the top of our lungs. To experience a room of brain-dead employees become an adrenaline filled mob in a matter of minutes was surreal. Watching Matt Stone riff on characters and voices was also surreal.

I do try to stay in touch with some of my close friends on the show, and I feel blessed that I was treated like family by many of my co-workers at South Park—because L.A. is a very different city than Austin—and it was tough to make the same type of friends and connections that I have in Texas.

Starting in South Park, Kevin Carlson Heads Straight to Dawgtown4

How did you come up with Dawgtown, your app to help connect dog owners? Do you have any canine companions in your life?

Being a lifelong dog owner myself, I firmly believe that the shared experience of dog ownership is the ultimate common denominator. So the idea behind Dawgtown was to create a handheld means of accessing one’s like-minded community of dog-friendly people, places, and products. When a respected colleague at South Park resonated with the idea, I moved back to Austin to go all-in on realizing the vision for Dawgtown. A little over a year later, we’ve just launched our first version on the iOS App Store, which was a big milestone for us.

I have an 11-month-old puppy named Shia. He’s an Aussiedoodle—an Australian Shepherd and Poodle mix. He looks more like a panda bear than a dog. He’s 70 pounds of pure, mischievous fluff. Shia was my first foray into raising a young puppy on my own, and he has been a case study in responsibility over these past nine months. His full-time job is trying to convince me to play with him, which he does by chewing his rope on top of my head or smashing his paw on my keyboard when I’m working. Other hobbies include eating ice cubes (he knows how to use our ice dispenser) and prancing around with the biggest stick he can find when we go to the park.

If you were a breed of dog, what would you be and why?

I’d probably say I aspire to be one of these Doodle mixes that have become so popular, just to be able to claim I’m athletic, attractive, and intelligent. But my friends and family would probably say Jack Russell Terrier since I have a tendency to yap a lot and run in circles when I’m bored. 

Anything else we should know about you?

I truly believe in the power of connecting. It’s something that I learned how to navigate and discuss while working in the entertainment industry, where the connection economy is universally known and utilized, but I think the power of your personal network is an asset that a lot of people undervalue and underuse. I know the ‘ask’ part of the equation is easy to grasp, but more emphasis needs to be placed on the ‘give’. I feel driven to invest in the success of my network. Whether that be investing social capital and offering strategic introductions, investing financial capital and backing a friend’s Kickstarter, or investing emotional capital and making an effort to understand the challenges being faced by the people I work with and care about. I want to do these things because I make a serious effort to surround myself with people I support and believe in. It doesn’t matter how you contribute, but the more genuinely vested you are in the success of your peers, the more they will actively vest themselves in you.

Photos: Adam Saraceno

A few weekends ago, I was at my business partner’s birthday gathering, lightly facilitating some sharing of his impact—what we appreciated in Edmond, what we saw in him that he might not see in himself. A friend of his commented that most people don’t get this level of appreciation and celebration reflected back to them until they are dead. At funerals, people give themselves permission to bring their emotions, to reminisce about favorite memories, to share the life-changing impacts that person has had on them. It feels cathartic and connecting—but the person who has passed isn’t hearing a word of it.

Why we should skip ahead to the good stuff

Too often, we wait until there is an ending or closing to say kind words, or we don’t give appreciative feedback at all. The ending doesn’t have to be death—it might be when a beloved employee announces she’s leaving a job. Heartwarming emails pour in in response to the farewell email, or some words are said at the company all-hands, or people write emotional notes of appreciation.

When I left a recent job, I received brief but beautiful emails from people I had interacted with only once or twice, sharing that even in their different function, they were inspired by seeing me show up as a senior woman at the company. I hadn’t known that. One of my direct reports showed up a few minutes late to our last one-on-one because she was writing a letter—a handwritten letter! I was also presented with a foam board with more notes from the engineering team and other coworkers.

Take the first step in creating a culture in which sharing appreciation and gratitude in the moment is as natural as showing up for daily stand-ups or checking email.

I treasure those words. They reflect to me what I already know, which is that in an imperfect system, I have lived and acted true to my values and what long-term success means to me. At the same time, I wonder what might have been different for me if I had deeply known the appreciation throughout my time there.

The impact of appreciative feedback

A few months ago, Edmond and I conducted a few dozen interviews to find the patterns in frustrations, pains, hopes, and dreams of engineers, tech leads, engineering managers, CTOs, and VPs of engineering. What struck us is that so many people cared deeply about doing well and were trying to do their best, but we heard this over and over again:

“I don’t even know if I’m doing a good job.”

When I reflect on moments in my own career that I’ve received meaningful appreciative feedback, a few come to mind. In written feedback at Google, at a time when I struggled with a feeling of having “snuck” in through their internship program (rather than the normal full slate of rigorous interviews), my manager told me the work I was doing was on par with what was expected of more-senior engineers. That gave me a concrete calibration of how I was doing, so I was able to leave behind a lot of those feelings of uncertainty. A year or so after I left Google, I had lunch with a senior engineer who had been my mentor there. He mentioned in conversation that he felt like my career was a rocket ship and soon he would see me as a CTO of a large tech company. He showed me a glimpse of how he saw me as a leader before I saw myself that way.

There was also the time after I returned from my second maternity leave. I felt like I was doing all right, and as I transitioned from four days a week back to five, my manager told me, “It feels like after your maternity leave, you leveled up a huge step. I bet a lot of people didn’t even know you were working only four days a week.” The impact was that I had a better sense of the perception people had of me and my work—and that rather than just doing all right, I was kicking ass.

In each of these instances, something that was clear as day to the other person was obscured for me, and by sharing what they had seen or noticed in me, it shifted how I viewed myself.

Kicking off the gratitude loop

Companies are starting to catch on to the importance of expressing gratitude. Anil Dash, the CEO of software company Glitch, wrote on Medium about how Glitch fosters a culture of gratitude, and Camille Fournier shared how they did this at Rent The Runway. And Jen Dennard of Range Labs, a company that facilitates better communication and strengthens relationships among teams, wrote about building a culture of gratitude through high frequency and gratitude catered to each individual. Edmond and I try to express gratitude when we feel it and also reflect in our monthly debriefs with a prompt around what we’re grateful for.

When I started training to become a coach a year ago, the coaching skill of “acknowledgment”—noticing something positive about the other person and saying it to them out loud—was the most difficult for me. It felt awkward, inauthentic, contrived. Positive feedback in the form of “good job” felt like a pat on the head—condescending, almost. I imagine it feels that way for many people—and so we shy away from it, hoping that people already know what we appreciate about them.

I’ve found that more-specific prompts guide me and make it feel more structured and less awkward to share appreciation and gratitude.

  • What quality do you see in this person that they might not see in themselves?
  • What is the most noticeable change you’ve seen since you started working with this person?
  • What qualities do you most appreciate about this person? What do you see as possible for them if they lean into these qualities more fully?
  • What is your favorite memory of this person?

If you want this type of feedback, ask for it. Before your next one-one-one, take a moment to consider these prompts and share a piece of appreciative feedback. And then, in whatever way feels comfortable for you—perhaps in the same meeting, or in a Slack thread or email request—tell people that you’re looking to better understand your strengths and the impact you have on the those around you, and would love if they could answer one of these prompts. Take the first step in creating a culture in which sharing appreciation and gratitude in the moment is as natural as showing up for daily stand-ups or checking email.

Jean Hsu is a cofounder of Co Leadership and a member at Berkeley’s WeWork 2120 University Ave.

Celebrity stylist Karla Welch knows the importance of having a style uniform—and what happens when you try to fight it.  

Welch, dubbed the No. 1 power stylist by The Hollywood Reporter—with clients including Amy Poehler, Ruth Negga, Karlie Kloss, and Zooey Deschanel—recently booked a crack-of-dawn flight from Los Angeles to New York for an event at WeWork 205 Hudson. Bleary-eyed at 3:30 a.m. and prepping for her flight, Welch packed exactly one outfit: a dress. At the last minute, she threw in a favorite pair of jeans. Just in case.

When she landed in New York, she slipped on the dress to wear to the panel discussion about WISHI, the on-demand personal-styling platform she co-founded with stylist Cleo O’Hana. But the dress was all wrong, she says. Backup jeans it was.

Celebrity stylist Karla Welch’s own style uniform consists of three items: jeans, a blazer, and a white T-shirt.

That’s the power of a personal style uniform. “It’s a security blanket,” says Welch, who wears a white shirt, jeans, boots, and blazer during most of her nonstop days spent styling clients, consulting on advertising campaigns, and designing custom pieces for Justin Bieber’s world tours.

There’s a reason uniform dressing is catching on: When you streamline one aspect of your life, it frees up your brain to focus elsewhere. When you’re busy or building a company from the ground up, says Welch, “your mind is needed for other things.”  

At WeWork, Karla Welch shared the stage with fashion names like WISHI cofounder Clea O’Hana (left) and B Sides Jeans cofounder Stacy Daily (right).

Famously, Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs, and Barack Obama have all admitted to wearing nearly the same outfits every day; now entrepreneurs and ambitious workers are following suit (while ditching the suit). How to begin? First, take a deep breath. “The thing is, it’s just clothes,” Welch says. “You don’t need to stress out.”

Keep it supersimple. Ask yourself, What are you looking for? advises Welch, who says it’s the first question she poses to clients. For example: “clean lines, not too fussy, something to move around the city in.” Creating a style target helps narrow your options. Welch’s own uniform consists of three items: jeans, blazer, white T-shirt. Yours could be a slight variation: stylish trousers, say, or sweaters during the winter.

Consider your days. Are you in and out of meetings? Does your commute feel like it’s 100 degrees, even in the winter—except when it’s not? Your uniform should be adaptable and feel comfortable in a variety of situations. “A uniform is a time-saver so you can do better things,” Welch says. It should never be a source of worry.

Start with what you have. Uniform dressing seems like a minimalist endeavor, yet it’s easy to think you need to buy a new wardrobe. Don’t, says Welch, who advocates wearing pieces for years. Start by shopping your own closet. It’s less expensive and more sustainable—plus, creating a style identity from familiar pieces you already own makes it more likely you’ll stick with it.

Ask one crucial question. Pick items that make you feel powerful and build from there. Ask yourself, “Do I feel good in this item?” If the answer is yes, add it to your rotation. If the answer’s no, consider donating it.

Look to the greats. Channel inspiration from artists, cinema, and celebrities. Rei Kawakubo of Commes des Garçons dresses almost exclusively in black, save for the occasional white shirt. And the artist Georgia O’Keeffe was notoriously rigid with her self-created wardrobe—so much so that her iconic androgynous silk, cotton, and wool outfits have been showcased in museum exhibits.

Solicit a second opinion. If you’re at a loss, hire an expert. It might be a better use of your time than opening 47 shopping tabs in your browser and searching for the right piece. On WISHI, each user is matched with a professional stylist. You send photographs of your wardrobe, and the stylist sends back suggestions from your own closet and from online stores.

Beat back boredom. Growing up, Welch wore a school uniform, but instead of resenting the predictability and sameness, she says, “it pushed me to be creative.” The same goes for an adult uniform. “The goal is to feel confident, not bored,” she says. “It takes a remarkable amount of confidence to wear something over and over again.” And if repetition can breed success, then a uniform could be your strongest style move yet.

Photos by Lori Gutman

Looking for one-stop shopping for everyone on your list? We’ve gathered together a few dozen of our favorite gifts from WeWork members that will satisfy your fitness-obsessed mother, coffee-loving spouse, bookish nephew, world-traveling friend, or workaholic boss without putting a dent in your wallet.

For the dreamer

Blox party: The GoldieBlox Craft-Struction Box is as much for big kids as little ones. The 275-piece kit, created by the member company at WeWork 1111 Broadway in Oakland, California, was designed to disrupt gender norms by introducing girls to STEM concepts like prototyping and problem-solving. Don’t bother looking for instructions—the only rule is to follow your imagination. $35

Totes amazing: Each of the memorable quotes on Time Travel Mart’s Student Quote Totes was written by a young author in 826LA, a nonprofit writing and tutoring organization in Los Angeles based at Pasadena’s WeWork 177 E Colorado Blvd. Gift the bright red bag to the budding writer for their manuscripts and books. $12

Best bud: Think too hard about the magic behind WinkyLux Flower Balm, made by a member based at London’s WeWork North West House, and you might go insane wondering how exactly they get that tiny chrysanthemum in the center—or how a clear balm can transform into the most flattering shade of pink ever once it hits your lips. Sometimes a little mystery is a good thing. $14

Written in the stars: Each set of Whiskey River Soap astrology pencils is filled with fun reminders of an astrological sign’s personality traits, from Pisces’ spot-on assessment as a “stray animal collector” to Capricorn’s simple and true description, “bossy AF.” $11

Color story: Help a friend fight blank-wall boredom with this limited-edition Mike Natter “Crayons” print from Art Sugar, an art collective based at New York’s WeWork 205 Hudson that gives a platform to underrepresented artists with large social-media followings. Feel-good bonus: At checkout, choose which charity will receive 5 percent of your buy’s proceeds. Starting at $20 without frame

For the adventurer  

Travel buddies: Ditch your long-held assumptions: Compression socks aren’t just for ultramarathoners and grannies. The tight fit can actually improve your blood and lymph flow if you sit a lot at work or are taking a superlong flight. These stylish versions from Comrad are the kind of socks that anyone would be happy to unwrap. $48 for three pairs

Quick-change agent: This nifty five-in-one universal travel adapter, which includes a USB port, is a lifesaver no matter where in the world you find yourself. The Flight 001 team, which works out of WeWork 109 S 5th St in Brooklyn, color-coded each adapter so that getting connected in your hotel room or WiFi café is easier than finding your connecting flight. $35

Light show: The lightweight Solar Puff is a waterproof, pop-up, solar-powered lantern that illuminates everything from camping trips to outdoor soirees. The product is brilliant in more ways than one: The brand behind the magic, Solight—a member at WeWork 123 E 23rd St in New York—is on a mission to provide sustainable light and power to areas of the world that need it most. $30

Sweet dreams: Any jet-setter worth their roller bag knows that the real key to enjoying a vacation is getting some solid shut-eye. The Good Night Sleep Tight Kit from new WeWork member Izola has all the tools to help you drift off: an eye mask, earplugs, bath oil with calming lavender, and a face oil to keep skin dewy, even on long-haul red-eye flights. $35

New flame: The soy-wax candles—based on U.S. states—from Homesick are fragrant reminders of a specific favorite vacation spot, childhood stomping grounds, or college hometown. (The Colorado candle, for instance, smells like spruce needles and spice.) Each uniquely-scented blend is hand-poured in the U.S. $30

For the foodie

Small fry: The 8-inch Chatham ceramic frypan from GreenPan, based at 1460 Broadway in New York, makes even simple morning eggs that much easier thanks to its nontoxic, nonstick finish. It’s dishwasher-safe and can be safely used with metal utensils. Insert prayer-hands emoji here. $40

Buzz feed: Take someone’s morning brew to the next level with Al Mokha Reserve’s Al Wudiyan coffee, which comes ground or in full beans. The medium roast has citrus and cherry notes, but it’s not just a tasty cup of joe; the company, which works out of WeWork Universal North in Washington, D.C., has a sweet mission: to promote economic stability and security in Yemen by creating jobs there. $32

Sugar rush: The Sabiya Gift Box from Elements Truffles is a chocoholic’s nirvana: It includes three chocolate bars, eight assorted truffles, and a bag of turmeric-infused drinking chocolate. Plus, all are Ayurvedainspired—which means they’re technically good for you (right?). $35

Authentic eats: The Classic box from Bokksu, a member at WeWork 205 Hudson, is chock-full of straight-from-Japan treats, such as hand-ground matcha and Hokkaido milk cookies. It’s basically like gifting someone a direct flight to Tokyo, minus the TSA lines and jet lag. $39

Joe on the go: Three busy dads, all members at WeWork 81 Prospect St in Brooklyn, came up with the idea for Stojo, a collapsible silicone coffee cup that’s commuter friendly—and keeps disposable cups from hitting landfills. Drink up. $25

For the fitness enthusiast

Save our strands: Pop the Hair-O-Scopes Brightest Stars set from Brigeo, a member at WeWork 27 E 28 St in New York, in a friend’s gym bag to save them from generic-gym-shampoo disappointment. The kit contains shampoo, conditioning spray, blow-dry cream, and a conditioning mask to help hydrate dry winter hair. $39

Write on: All it takes is five minutes a day for someone to write their way to a more positive outlook, whether that drives them to accomplish new goals in the weight room or finally commit to a half-marathon. The Five Minute Journal from Intelligent Change uses psychology research to help the author focus on gratitude. $23

Clear winner: The sleek A6 bottle from Memobottle, a certified B-Corp company, is designed to be the same size and shape as an A6 memo pad—meaning it slips easily into a pocket or gym bag—making it a stylish reminder to hydrate before and after a workout.  $28

Fitness fixer-upper: You know your cycling-class buddy who always forgets their socks? The Pinch Provisions gym kit is for them. The pocket-size kit also contains earbuds, deodorant towelettes, electrolyte tablets, and more—so they’ll never be caught unprepared again. $24

Toe tappers: After a sock-soaking workout, it’s a joy to change into these Conscious Step Socks That Fight Poverty. The sustainably run company, which works out of WeWork 109 S 5th St in New York, donates to various charities around the globe. Each style benefits a different cause; this particular pair aids Global Citizens, a social-action platform to end poverty. $15

For the Workaholic

Save face: Help your favorite type A unwind with a little self-care. Oars and Alps, a brand started by two members at Chicago’s WeWork 220 N Green St, offers a starter kit of their favorite all-natural picks: face and eye cream, a rollerball eye stick, and mint lip balm. $48

Tag, you’re it: Show your favorite supervisor who’s boss with a keychain and tag that says it all. The hand-stamped brass tag from Art Ayaloka is a constant reminder of their confidence and success. $20

It’s lit: Lighting the Balsam Fir candle from Ranger Station, a member at WeWork 901 Woodland St in Nashville, is like setting yourself down in the middle of a balsam-lined forest and breathing deep. And the calm keeps coming: The candle’s burn time is 40 hours. $44

Fresh start: Help a coworker beat burnout with a Bergamot Bath Bar from Commodity, a member at WeWork 401 Park Ave S in New York. The scent was devised by a scientist with a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, and the blend of citrus and bright green notes is an invigorating way to begin every day. $24,

A good sign: The phrase “What Good Shall I Do This Day?” was a mantra of Founding Father Benjamin Franklin—a man who knew a thing or two about innovation. This enamel steel sign from Best Made is a brain-boosting addition to any workstation. $32

“Yes, this is a fish-leather skirt!” actress and activist Alysia Reiner proclaimed, gesturing at her ’90s-inspired black miniskirt as she stood in front of 150 people gathered at New York’s WeWork 1460 Broadway for the recent launch party of her Livari collaboration collection. “It’s from Brazil, from fish that’s been eaten,” she told the crowd. “[The skin] would have been thrown away—but no, [we said] let’s make cool products out of it.”

This sustainable ethos permeates every design from Livari, the ethical, zero-waste fashion label Reiner cofounded with stylist Claudine DeSola and designer and Women’s March organizer Tabitha St. Bernard-Jacobs. Their new collection showcases style and sustainability with every piece: ballet flats created in collaboration with Oka-B ($60) are made with Microplast, a recycled tmaterial; limited-edition fabric sleeves for sustainable glass straws designed in partnership with Simply Straws (from $20); a leather clutch made with Elvis & Kresse (£160) is crafted of leather scraps discarded by Burberry, reclaimed blankets made from material used in the printing industry; and hot orange parachute panels from discarded (actual) parachutes.

“Fashion is wearable art,” says Reiner, who works out of WeWork 8 W 126th St in New York. The actress, best known for her roles in Orange Is the New Black, The Deuce, and Better Things, developed an appreciation for fashion early in life. “My grandmother was a huge lover of clothing and would buy clothing from all over,” such as a piece of embroidery from Istanbul, Reiner recalls. “She really taught me about workmanship.” Her grandmother used to take her to the Piggy Bank Shop, a second-hand store in Westchester County, New York. “I learned about reusing and not having to buy new to find incredible things,” says Reiner.

Alysia Reiner (center) joins Livari cofounders Tabitha St. Bernard-Jacobs (left) and Claudine DeSola (right) at an event at WeWork celebrating the launch of her collection.

Today, as a stage/TV/film actress, she gets to work with top costume designers, like OITNB and Girls costumer Jenn Rogen. “[She] taught me how a character can be informed by a costume,” says Reiner. “Once she put me in stripes, saying, ‘You are like a ref in this scene.’”

Reiner’s passion for style and artistry brought her together with longtime friend DeSola—a stylist on OITNB, House of Cards, Jane the Virgin, Younger, and other shows—and St. Bernard-Jacobs shortly after the 2016 election. What began with a focus group of women talking about their favorite pieces of clothing evolved into their first Livari collection, a mixture of everyday and statement pieces with a practical twist (think pockets and adjustable waists).

When press coverage and reviews exceeded their expectations, the three cofounders—each balancing their respective first careers with their new venture—were faced with a serious question: “How do we sustain this idea?” After all, Reiner’s acting career shows no signs of slowing down; her next feature film, the comedy Egg, is due out in theaters and video on demand on Jan. 18.

The women soon found their answer: “We decided to do collaborations,” Reiner explains. With the added goal of incorporating a nonprofit component into every piece, the trio set out to find partners—and causes. The Oka-B-collaboration ballet flats give back to Still She Rises, which benefits incarcerated mothers (Reiner is on the board); the Livari-designed glass-straw sleeves benefit oceans organization Lonely Whale; and the leather clutch designed with Elvis & Kresse benefits Barefoot College, which specializes in training female solar engineers.

It all adds up to a brand that embodies so much of what Reiner believes in personally. “I think Alysia is very thoughtful about her platform, and she uses it to highlight clean living and speak about us having an impact in the world around us,” says St. Bernard-Jacobs.

Their recent pivot into collaborations has allowed the three women flexibility in more ways than one. They can tap categories such as lifestyle, jewelry, and activewear—and, through strategic partnerships with nonprofits, expand their mission. “Our goal is to be wherever people need us,” says Reiner, “to support charities and to be at the frontline of design—fearless and at the cutting edge.”

But where can we get a fish-leather skirt like hers? “Skirts are custom at this point,” Reiner says. “Being zero-waste, we don’t manufacture anything without a request.”

Photos by Scott Rosenthal